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Deceased estates

If you’ve lost a loved one, we’re immensely sorry for your loss. We know this is a difficult time and we want to make the process of finalising their account as quick as possible for you.

How to notify Powershop that someone has passed away

The Australian Death Notification Service (ADNS) is a national program that allows you to notify multiple organisations, including Powershop, that a loved one has passed away. This limits how many difficult conversations you have to have during this time.

If you wish to use the ADNS please follow the link above and fill out the online form. Through this notification from the ADNS, we can complete the process of finalising your loved one’s account. If you have already used the ADNS you can use the service again to notify Powershop.


If you don’t wish to contact the ADNS

While we recommend using the ADNS, if you would rather notify Powershop separately, you are welcome to do so. Please provide the following details of your loved one and their account-

  1. Legal name
  2. Date of birth
  3. Property address and account number (if known)
  4. A copy of their death certificate
  5. Your contact details

You can contact us and share these details via one of the following:


Options for managing your loved one’s account

After this notification is complete, we will contact you to discuss your options for managing your loved one’s account. Your options on the account are -

1. Transfer the account into a new name
If you wish to keep the power on for the long term or temporarily, we will help transfer the account into a new name to ensure the lights stay on.

2. Cancel the account
If power is no longer needed at the property, please let us know and we can arrange to cancel the service.


If you have any questions please give us a call on 1800 462 668, we are here to support you as best we can.


Who can change the deceased customer’s account or power supply?
To be able to change a deceased customer’s account or power supply you need to be authorised to act on their account. You might be a secondary account holder, an executor of the estate, their solicitor, or a trustee.